Italian Trademark Museum
 
 
 

The Plasmon logo

 
Plasmon
Plasmon - Chiudilettera
Plasmon - Manifesto pubblicitario
Plasmon - Manifesto pubblicitario
Plasmon - Confezione cilindrica
Plasmon
Plasmon
Plasmon - Pagina pubblicitaria
Plasmon - Automezzo
Plasmon - Pagina pubblicitaria
Plasmon - Particolare Pagina pubblicitaria
Plasmon
Plasmon - Marchio-manifesto
Plasmon - Pagina pubblicitaria
Plasmon - Olio scatola latta
Plasmon - Particolare Pagina pubblicitaria
Plasmon
Plasmon
Plasmon
Plasmon
Plasmon
Plasmon - Packaging 1983
Plasmon
Plasmon - Packaging 2000
Plasmon
Plasmon - Packaging 2009

The history of Plasmon's logo

The firm, initially oddly called "Sindacato Italiano del Plasmon" ("Italian Plamon Syndicate"), was established in Milan in 1902 thanks to the initiative of a physician, Cesare Scotti, who was to remain its president until after the end of the First World War. The "Syndicate" was set up for the production and sale of pure Plasmon and to carry on research into its possible future applications. Plasmon was a protein concentration capable of integrating the nutritional requirements of early infancy at the time. The product had been developed by a joint German and British team off scientists and it was in the latter country that Plasmon was patented and first produced to be then exported throughout the rest of Europe. In 1904 the Italian subsidiary acquired the manufacturing and brand license from its German parent company. The trade-mark's style eloquently witnessed to the penchant for antiquity of German culture of the times. It in fact comprised a column, a capital, a sculptor, a pedestal, and the word "Plasmon" in Greek-style lettering as well as "1901", the year of foundation of the German parent company. Judging from the trade-mark it appears how even the very name "Plasmon" was meant to suggest the scope of the protein booster and its effects on potential consumers, that is to promote their healthy and sturdy growth, to "mould" ("plasmare", in Italian) them in the best way possible. In 1916 the firm became wholly Italian and hence changed its name to "Società del Plasmon". But the product for which Plasmon was to become a household name and a popular "cookie" with Italian children and adults alike, the Plasmon biscuit, had to wait until 1930 to see the light. In the fifties the trade-mark was updated for purely graphic design requirements that were satisfied by introducing some shading and encircling the device. At the same time it became clear that as far as corporate identity was concerned the figure of the sculptor was merely a symbolic illustration and did not represent the trade-mark proper. A complementary logotype was also created in the shape of a biscuit and with upper case lettering. The 1961 was a revolutionary year as far as the history of baby food goes because it was in this year that homogenates first hit the market. The sculptor was slightly restyled conferring the figure lighter traits and doing away with the circle. In 1966 the action-packed scene had become the focus of the trade-mark around which was printed the name of the company. This design was the work of Bod Noorda. In the seventies the sculptor was once more enclosed, this time within an oval. In 1974 product name became a company name so that "Società del Plasmon" changed to "Plasmon Dietetici Alimentari". Baby food can be said to have truly come of age when in 1981 Plasmon undertook a far-reaching quality assurance project called "Oasi ecologica Plasmon". Crops and stock were rigorously selected and processed according to strict quality control standards and procedures managed by Plasmon veterinarians and analysts. It was also the occasion for changes to the trade-mark, a task that was assigned to Gio Rossi. The sculptor was streamlined and the pedestal deleted, and the wording that had been on the pedestal was shifted up to the capital. An innovative feature was the complementary logotype, new in that it was now done in upper case lettering. The first "Oasi ecologica" brand logo in which all elements harmoniously blended in with each other was designed by the Break agency in 1994. In 2009 the restyling featuring a return to the logo which characterised the fifties: a magenta biscuit shape, in which the sculptor and the logotype find their place.