Italian Trademark Museum
 
 
 

The Poste Italiane logo

 
Poste Italiane - Stemma ufficio postale Regno Sardegna
Poste Italiane - Divisa portalettere
Poste Italiane - Insegno ufficio postale Regno Italia
Poste Italiane - Regie poste
Poste Italiane - Stemma ufficio postale italiano estero
Poste Italiane - Stemma ufficio postale italiano estero
Poste Italiane - Automezzo
Poste Italiane - Automezzo
Poste Italiane - Distintivo
Poste Italiane - Insegna anni 50 - Museo del Marchio Italiano
Poste Italiane - Automezzo
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane
Poste Italiane - Insegna uffici postali
Poste Italiane - Museo del Marchio Italiano
Poste Italiane - Museo del Marchio Italiano
Poste Italiane - Automezzo
Poste Italiane - Insegna bandiera

The history of Poste Italiane's logo

The first mail delivery service in the Italian territory was set up in Piedmont, then part of the Kingdom of Savoy, in the sixteenth century. In the nineteenth century before Italian unification the various states of the Peninsula were running independent postal services. In 1862 a state monopoly was established with a post-master general called the "Regie Poste". Then, in 1889 the Government Post Office and Telegraphy Department was instituted and the coat-of-arms of the Kingdom of Savoy, that is a white cross against a red background, was adopted as the official emblem. Already in the early years of the twentieth century the royal postal service was not only carrying and delivering letters and parcels, but was also running a telegraph service, issuing postal orders, and even managing savings deposits. After World War II and the advent of the Republic, the sign was changed to merely two letters "PT", the abbreviation of "Poste e Telegrafo" and then later of "Poste e Telecomunicazioni". As there were no standards, several signs were used by the Italian Post Office over the years, especially an orange bird with tilted lettering and various "PT" logograms. The 1996 was a crucial year for the Post Office as it was turned into a joint-stock company. Franco Maria Ricci was commissioned to do the trade-mark that portrays an mail envelope traversed by horizontal lines that continue on obliquely to the left thus giving an idea of dynamism. Lettering with serifs was adopted for the official name. Full independence was celebrated in 2000 with a new trade-marl designed by the Fragile studio. "Posteitaliane" in blue lettering appears inside a horizontal "lime" yellow strip over which broods a panoramic view of an Italian landscape. This is quite an original solution as a photographic print is used as part of a company's trade-mark. But as peculiar as it may be it is successful in conveying a dynamic image of the company. Another interesting feature is that the two words in Univers lettering making up the name have been joined together to form a single word. Although slightly changed, the "PT" picture-gram has been purposefully retained as a sign of continuity with the past.